Momma has lost her mind.

Crayola Turds.

I love when humor is handed to you. I think it’s the universe’s way of saying, “Here, you look like you could use this today.” This was one of those times.

Two days ago, I posted this picture on Facebook:

1526587_10151828441586231_115607814_n
You’d think after nibbling on one, he wouldn’t want to try it again.

I captioned it with a witty bit about Little Man’s teeth marks in the crayons.

Today, after I baked the most delicious concoction of a cookie my sweet tooth has ever made love to (desert is no joke in my house), my husband deemed the cookies, Crayola Turds.  Lets see if you can figure out why…

1528658_10151832775331231_1588380152_n

Crude humor is second nature to me, so this is a level of funny that I couldn’t help but share. No, I did not plan for this joke by adding yellow and orange, Reese pieces to these magnificent cookies. And yes, I had to put the cookie in the diaper for the effect.

These cookies will now and forever be known as, Crayola Turds.

Now that is some funny shit!

 

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Momma has lost her mind.

Crayola Turds.

I love when humor is handed to you. I think it’s the universe’s way of saying, “Here, you look like you could use this.” This was one of those times.

Two days ago, I posted this picture on Facebook:

1526587_10151828441586231_115607814_n
You’d think after nibbling on one, he wouldn’t want to try it again.

I captioned it with a witty bit about Little Man’s teeth marks in the crayons.

Today, after I baked the most delicious concoction of a cookie my sweet tooth has ever made love to (desert is no joke in my house), my husband deemed the cookies, Crayola Turds.  Lets see if you can figure out why.

1528658_10151832775331231_1588380152_n

Crude humor is second nature to me, so this is a level of funny that I couldn’t help but share. No, I did not plan for this joke by adding yellow and orange, Reese pieces to these magnificent cookies. And yes, I had to put the cookie in the diaper for the effect.

These cookies will now and forever be known as, Crayola Turds.

Now that is some funny shit!

Life can be serious business.

Depression and Motherhood: This is My Truth.

Tom Gauld
Tom Gauld

My truth about struggling with depression and being a mom is not pretty.  It’s not a feel good story. It’s a story that continues to evolve.

My depression started at a young age.  As a child, I was exposed to a type of environment where my predisposed genes didn’t have a fighting chance to stay hidden.  I was never put in treatment and I don’t believe it was even recognized by the adults around me.  It wasn’t until I was in my late teens/early 20’s that even I recognized it.

My depression was masked a lot in my 20’s by numbing myself with alcohol.  A shitty day just meant I really needed to get drunk.  If I look back at my 20’s, I was a damn good functioning alcoholic that balanced school, work and partying quite well.  Until I didn’t.

Around my mid to late 20’s, the effects of the depression became harder and harder to bury or ignore.  It was like anything in life, you can only bury your demons for so long and then boom.  I started to have bad weeks instead of days.  I wanted nothing to do with anyone, including myself.  I finally gave in and began taking an anti-depressant in conjunction with psychotherapy.  It worked for the time being.

I began working in the field of mental health after graduating college.  Do what you know right?  Being the one who evaluated countless people in the ER, I knew the lingo and the symptoms that usually led to an admission on the mental health unit, a place where I also worked.  This created so much internal conflict for me.  I loved what I did and was good at it because I could truly empathize.  But it also created a lot of fear in regards to dealing with my own struggles.  I couldn’t even be completely honest with my therapist because I was scared that if I admitted to certain things such as having suicidal thoughts and any sort of plan, I would be seen as a safety risk.  I couldn’t let myself fall in to the broken mental health system, even as broken as I was.  So I continued to work harder at dancing around my symptoms instead of trudging through the heartache of admitting to myself or even a professional what was really going on in my own head.

I was so angry.  I lashed out at complete strangers.  I fell apart over spilled milk.  My work became impossible because everything triggered me.  The individual’s stories became too difficult to hear and I was no longer helping anyone, especially myself.  I literally fell to pieces.  I thankfully had a primary care doctor at the time that was more than just a normal doctor.  I trusted her so I went to her office in the middle of the day during work.  I could not pull myself together and I didn’t really have an explanation as to why.  She took me out of work for the next few days.  I called my husband, scared to death what he would think and say.  He, being the man that he is, told me not to worry about anything and to just take care of myself.  I went home and went to bed.  I didn’t get up for three days.  When I did I felt better but knew I was right back where I had been before.  It was time to start taking medication again and get back in to therapy.

Shortly after that, at the age of 27, I got pregnant.  Although I wasn’t a lover of being pregnant, I have to say I was never happier.  The boost of hormones were fabulous and I felt great.  And then the third trimester happened.  I plummeted.  I hated myself because how could I be so awfully sad about and ungrateful for the life inside me.  I hated that I hated myself.  I felt bad for feeling bad.

After my daughter was born, I had the normal baby blues but thankfully it passed and within a few weeks I had fallen in love with my little girl.  But then something flipped that switch.  The switch that I have learned I have no control over.  I became numb, her needs became overwhelming.  I became an auto pilot mom.  I did what I needed to do but that was about it.  This wasn’t the normal, over tired, overwhelmed, new mom effect.  This was joyless motions.  It was feeling like a failure with every action.  This was irrational.  I can remember thinking what a piece of shit I was that I wasn’t happy about my beautiful life.  To me, at that time, nothing was beautiful.

I reached a point where suicide seemed like a valid solution.  I was just existing anyway.  I wasn’t bringing anything good to the world around me, including the people in it, so what was the fucking point.  I cried so hard when no one was looking.  I couldn’t look in mirrors because I hated what I saw.  It is a scary and very lonely place to be. I felt like I was different than every person/woman/mom around me.  I didn’t dare admit to having suicidal thoughts to anyone, even my husband. What kind of mother or wife am I if I admit to feeling like I need to leave him and my children.

I don’t know how I got through that particular rough patch if I am being honest.  But time went on and I survived.  My relationship had good days and bad days.  On the bad days, I just knew my husband was going to leave me and I didn’t blame him.  Who wants to live with someone that can’t seem to get her shit together and falls apart or blows up when the wind blows to the east.  I tried so hard.  I would take medicine for a while, stabilize and then go off of it because I felt like I had it under control.  Which is madness in itself.  I was the one encouraging people to take their meds with over used scripts like “if you had diabetes you wouldn’t not take your meds, well depression is no different”.  I was actually fighting everyone elses battles, with a vengeance, to help erase their pain and the stigma of living with a mental illness, but yet couldn’t take my own advice.

After my second child was born, I was on a high fueled with love and what felt like a completion of my family.  I chose not to take medicine with both of my pregnancies and have yet to go back on them since having my son, who is now 15 mths old.  I’m starting to feel the need and see the signs again.  I hate it.  I hate that I need a pill to be of sound mind but I’ve ridden this roller coaster long enough to know how dangerous it can be with out it.

It seems like my depression has gotten more intense after each of my children have been born.  I don’t know why.  Maybe it is the added stress or the changes to my body’s chemistry.  Even though I am able to recognize that funk that seems to cling to me when I am sliding down hill, I can’t prevent it.  I have days where I busy the kids with some sort of something so that I can cry in another room where they don’t see me and ask questions.  I feel so unworthy of my children’s forgiving love some days.

It’s not everyday or even every other week but I still have times when I question why I should continue with this misery.  It is insanely disabling to be in a place where you believe in your heart that a life without a Mom is better than a life with a Mom like me.  I say that with tears in my eyes because I know the damage of both.  My Mom was in and out of my life because of her mental illness and when she finally got on a healthier path mentally, she died of a physical illness.

People that say suicide is selfish are right.  It is.  However, for the person contemplating it or living with pain so great that it is seen as a reasonal option, it feels as if it is more of a gift.  A blessing to others.  Because now the people surrounding you no longer have to feel the effects of your broken being.  This has been my truth for so long.

I would like to say that I have overcome and gotten through the worst of it, but I know better now.  I have; however, come to terms with what this debilitating disease is capable of and am much more likely to ask for help when I need it.  One of the best things a therapist ever said to me was to question whether or not how I am feeling is rational.  If I can’t explain why I am feeling so sad or angry or worthless then it’s time to take better care of myself.  And that doesn’t mean a day at the spa.  I fucking hate it when people say “well make sure you are taking time for yourself.  Go get a massage”.  That is a band aid and if you suggest it you need to better educate yourself.  Taking better care of myself really means to admit to myself and those closest around me that I need an ear, support, a break, compassion and/or a shoulder.

There are all these stigmas attached to women with children that admit to having depression.  A big part of that is because of what is portrayed in the media but also because of the lack of education around mental illness as a whole.  So here, let me clear up a few.  No, I have never had thoughts to hurt my children (in a psychosis kind of way).  Yes, I am fit to raise my children, even on a bad day.  Yes, my kids friends are safe at my house, I have depression, I’m not neglectful.  Please don’t ask me how I am doing with a sad, overly concerned look on your face.  I know what you are really asking and it’s condescending and annoying.  No I don’t “check out” on my kids.  I may not be the lively, playful mother every day of the week but I’m not hiding in my room while they run loose and mold themselves in to psychopaths either.  Yes, I have bad days that are just that – a bad day.  And guess what, I am entitled to those.  If I flip someone off or cry over a commercial, it’s more than likely due to my hot head or exceptionally thin skin, not my diagnosis.  Yes, I have good days and no, I’m not pretending to be happy.  I am a genuinely happy person by nature.  And here is a big one.  Please take note of this one because it is the worst thing you could ever say to someone like me.  Don’t ever assume that a person can “snap out of it”.  It’s impossible and you’re being naïve and downright hateful if you think ANYONE would choose to feel the way I have attempted to describe.

Depression looks different to everyone that suffers from it.  However, I have learned through personal and professional experience that those that live with it have one thing in common – loneliness.  I wish people talked candidly about it.  I wish women felt more comfortable and less shame about admitting these type of thoughts and feelings.  I just hope that by sharing my story, someone will feel less alone and less shameful.

Momma has lost her mind.

All Up In The Mommyhood.

If you have every driven a motorcycle or as in my case , ridden on the back,  you know that it’s pretty much a given to get a wave when you drive by another rider.  The Mommyhood is like that.  It’s a collective spirit that encompasses and understands the range of emotion that is connected to the title Mom.

In the Mommyhood, you may hear or see:

  • twenty words shared in just one glance.
  • your aisle in the store cleared so you can get to the door with your screaming four old as quick as possible.
  • a smile, not eyes rolling, when you brag about what your “genius” child did that day.
  • women laughing hysterically at the lessons learned from their first child.
  • sanity saving tips being shared with first timers.
  • hand me downs given instead of sold.
  • gestures of understanding, not judgment, when you refer to your darling children as life sucking, little dictators that need way more attention and patients than you have to give.
  • an appreciation for coffee, wine and small talk.
  • protective eyes of all children within sight.
  • encouragements to ask for a no charge babysitting session when you are on the verge of losing your shit.
  • a unanimous vote that stepping on Barbie shoes and matchbox cars can cause a release of demons like on one has ever seen.
  • a universal agreement that a dirty house means you had a busy day.
  • confessions of poor parenting choices that will never be repeated.

The camaraderie amongst women whose bellies bare the same life offering scars is encouraging.  Mothers of different ages, races, cultures, political parties and socioeconomic backgrounds can all agree on one thing: Motherhood breaks down all prejudices and reinforces the building blocks of love.

When I was a little girl, I loved to create clubs with my BFFs – I am the babysitter club generation.  I feel that since becoming a Mom, I unknowingly entered this club where admission is anything but free but the perks are inspiring.